Mothers of the Mayflower

pilgrims-on-ship-300x169

One hundred two passengers. Twenty-four children. Nine cats. One cargo ship, ninety feet long. Sixty-four days on a stormy sea. A possible recipe for disaster—at least in this day and age.

If I had set sail with my children, I would have preferred a private room, catered meals, and disposable diapers. And I would have requested a cruise liner instead of a 1620’s trading vessel.

pilgrims_landing1

At the end of the voyage I would have demanded my own bed—not an isolated windswept beach; a lonely place where nearly half of their company would be buried that first year.

Why did they do it? What gave them the courage to gamble with their lives under such conditions?

“For the glory of God” and in “honor of our King and country,” they wrote in their Mayflower Compact. Despite their hardships, they were determined to be a “civil body politic” making and obeying laws for the common good.

Perhaps there’s a direct relationship between personal sacrifice and results—like a timeless math equation.

If I went on a cruise, what would I become? A little groggy, a little too pampered, a little overweight.

But, what did their demanding voyage produce? A colony. A nation. A better life for their children. The chance to worship God as they pleased, and leave a stagnant life behind.

thankgiving2Of the eighteen women aboard the ship, only five lived to celebrate their first harvest; but their sacrifices are remembered, three hundred and ninety-seven Thanksgivings later.

And what of the new life they sought for their children? It was everything they hoped for, and more.

One hundred fifty years later, during a trip back to the Old World, Benjamin Franklin observed that even the poorest American farmers were “princes” when compared to the peasants of Great Britain.

Mothers of the Mayflower, all those stormy, cold, wet days and nights, with sea biscuits and seasick children, I thank you. And my children thank you, too.

Note: A few years ago I visited the Mayflower II, near Plymouth, Massachusetts.  
The boat was small but sturdy. Families were given a sectioned area in the damp hold (about 4’x4′) for their personal sleeping space.  The sides of the hold were wet and “sweating,” a good sign that the ship was water safe; but the hold did not provide a comforting wall to lean against.
Homes on the Plimoth Plantation (yes, that’s the correct spelling) looked down
on the cold, blue Atlantic Ocean. When the Mayflower returned to England the following April, not a single pilgrim was on the ship. Despite the hardships of that first winter, they all opted to press on.
An expectant mother explains about household chores in her drafty, thatched-roof home.
Every November when I revisit the story of the Pilgrims and read about the Mayflower inhabitants, I shed a few tears.  Thank you, valiant men and women!

One thought on “Mothers of the Mayflower

  1. Ami Jacobs says:

    I’m personally grateful for the Mayflower pilgrims, as 2 of them are my ancestors! ❤️

    On Tue, Nov 20, 2018 at 6:35 AM Meadowlark Media wrote:

    > Nettie H. Francis posted: ” One hundred two passengers. Twenty-four > children. Nine cats. One cargo ship, ninety feet long. Sixty-four days on a > stormy sea. A possible recipe for disaster—at least in this day and age. If > I had set sail with my children, I would have preferred a pri” >

    Liked by 1 person

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